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2012 DN GOLD CUP WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP


The Worlds According To Ron

Worlds 2012 Lake Hjälmaren, Orebro, Sweden
Jan 28 - Feb 4, 2012

Set up on Lake Hjälmaren.

The 2012 Worlds presented many challenges. Going into these events I want to be prepared as possible because I don’t want have any excuses for not doing well. If I don’t win, it’s because of mistakes I make. If I listed all the things that I did wrong on this trip you would wonder how I got around the race course at all. So I’ve decided to first list the things that I did right.



• Eating Right: I ate lots of salads and pasta. I also made sure to keep hydrated by drinking plenty of water.

• Physical Condition: I spent time in the gym and had my weight right where I wanted it. I also made sure to get plenty of rest during the regatta.

• Equipment: All of my equipment was perfect-the boat, planks, mast, sails, and boom. My thirteen sets of runners were all profiled, stoned, and shimmed.

• Clothing: I had the right clothing to keep me comfortable, my trilam suit, track shoes, and all that stuff was perfect.

• Travel: Driving from Bad Zwischenahn, Germany to Orebro, Sweden in Torsten Siem’s customized Freightliner truck was first class. Leon Lebeau, Torsten and I were able to keep everything clean and dry. The sleeping bunks that Torsten built made for a very low stress trip and kept us well rested.

Leon Lebeau, Toledo sailor Kent Baker, and I flew out on a Monday from Detroit and landed Tuesday in Bremen, Germany at noon. We went to Torsten Siems’ house where he had already positioned all of our equipment into his immaculate workshop.

Our boats, properly stored.

After opening up our equipment, we reviewed our to-do list which included tying battens in all the sails, replacing worn hardware, checking the squareness of the planks to the hulls, and reprofiling, stoning, and shimming all the runners. That evening we went to dinner at Heinz’ Bar where we had German beer and Bullenschluck.

Wednesday was spent working on the equipment, especially reprofiling and shimming runners. I started out checking my spare plank which was a mistake because when I tried to line up my primary plank, everything got screwed up. I was really frustrated because I thought we had to leave the next morning. It was a relief to learn that we were leaving Friday morning which allowed me to have all of Thursday to realign both planks and things went much better.

Kent, Leon and I spent a full two and half days preparing our equipment for this regatta and we were really excited to begin racing because of all the practice we had this year. We felt ready for any type of condition that was thrown at us.

We arrived in Sweden Friday night, woke up early Saturday morning, had breakfast, and drove through Orebro to the site. We set up our boats and went out sailing. The conditions were really nice with the wind was blowing 10-12 knots. Leon and I were sailing around on our travel runners and having no trouble competing with the top level sailors who were probably also sailing on their travel runners.

We put the boats away and I was prepared for the racing to begin on Sunday. Saturday night we discovered that the decision for the site was made so late that the race committee decided to delay the start of the regatta until Monday. The race committee based their decision on the reality that one of the two ferries running between Talin, Estonia and Stockholm, Sweden was out of service making it difficult for some of the sailors who had been checking ice for European Commodore Joerg Bohn to make it to the race site on time for a Sunday start.

Between Saturday night and Sunday morning we realized there was trouble with Torsten’s batteries in his truck so we replaced them on Sunday morning. We went to the ice and Leon and I went out tuning again. This time we took several sets of runners with us and were trying to find the best set of runners for the conditions but results were inconclusive. It seemed as if I was going as good with my Estonian travel runners as I was with my minimum Ts. When ever I got near any of the other sailors my speed seemed equal or better. So I was confident I would be able to figure out which runners to use because there were three mini qualifier races to be sailed before the first Gold fleet race. By the results of those races, you can figure out which runners are working.

Leon on the bridge.

Monday we arrived early at the ice but there wasn’t a breath of wind. I was glad that the race committee postponed the day’s racing on shore rather than making us haul our boats all the way to the race course. Our boats were put together and ready to go to the race course but with the postponement it made it easier to stay warm by getting in the truck now and then. It’s nicer when the committee postpones on shore rather than having us trudge our boats all the way out there and all the way back for nothing. Leon and I took this time to go for three long walks, one out on the ice to check conditions, the second one across a long bridge out to explore an island, and then we walked through the woods next to the race site and discovered some really cool cottages.

Tuesday was much the same. We went to the ice and again they postponed on shore. There wasn’t any wind all day.

When we arrived Wednesday morning there was no wind but it picked up enough around lunch time to send us out to the race course. They started the Aluminum mini-qualifier but they missed making the time limit on the first lap by only 14 seconds. This left several stragglers out on the course and they had to wait for all those boats to get back to the starting area. That left just enough time to get the three mini qualifier races sailed on Wednesday but there was no time for a Gold fleet race that day. There was a variety of runners that worked, from 30” minimum Ts to short snow plates. So it was hard to tell which runners were working in these difficult conditions.

The long haul to the course.

Finally, late morning Thursday after a postponement due to no wind, the boats headed out to the course. I trudged out two miles hauling my boat with five sets of runners, two sails, and all my tools. When I got out there I took a couple of minutes to catch my breath. I barely had time to take my extra runners and sails off the boat to get up to the starting line. The flag was up when I was bringing the boat across the starting line.

The ice was glass black, covered with 1cm (3/8”) of sticky frost, and the wind was light. Word on the ice was that Ts and Estonian plates were the runner of choice. I kept my travel runners on and didn’t even have time to even check them before the first race, a mistake that would come to haunt me. The race started and the boat wouldn’t even go on a beam reach. Fortunately the wind came up and I was able to work my way up from last to 22nd. After the race, I discovered that the travel runners I had used were heavily damaged and that could have been part of my issue.

After taking 22nd in the first race I felt the pressure was off. I knew I was obviously not going win the Worlds and was sure they wouldn’t get in enough races for a throw out. After the first Gold race, they run a Silver race, and then the second Gold fleet race which doesn’t give you much time to make changes. Fortunately the breeze shifted and the race committee decided to change the starting line before the next Gold fleet race giving me extra time to try four different sets of runners, my travel runners, Nickel Teflon coated inserts, minimum Ts, and slipper runners.

There were a lot of really great sailors who were having trouble trying to pick the right runners for the conditions. I looked over at Eric Anderson, who had taken 11th in the first Gold race, and noticed that he was using three slipper runners that I had built for him. If we were sailing on snow in Minnesota, no one would have tried using short plate runners, just Ts or minimum inserts. I think the slipper runners worked better for this condition because of the flat black, glass like ice under the snow. If the ice is textured or bumpy under the snow, you will still need a long runner to bridge the bumps. The ice was perfect underneath the snow on Lake Hjälmaren and that’s why the short plate runners worked.

After the first race I adjusted the boat by moving the plank all the way forward and loosening up the forestay 1 cm. These adjustments resulted in a looser rig allowing the mast to bend easier giving me more leverage to put power into the boat vs. the drag of the snow. I put the slipper runners on and the boat just came alive, that really worked.

I got a good start in the second race partly due to the angle to the wind I chose, the runners, and adjustments. There were 5 boats to leeward of me that ran straight up across my bow. I was able to lay the boat off and sail through those 5 boats, get clean air, and get the boat going. I was lucky that I was able to pop through their wind shadow and get the boat hooked up and going fast quickly.

Michal Burczynski P-114 was to the leeward of me and I sailed right over him. I was unable to tack across the boat that started to weather of me and had to wait for him to tack which caused me to come in overstood at the upwind darling mark on port tack. I was out on the back deck hiking hard, pushing the boat really fast coming in to the darling mark. I was able to tack in front of everyone and round the weather mark in first place. I figured the left side must be working and went to the left side every upwind leg.

At the last windward mark, Tomasz Zakrzewski P- 55, passed me by going right, but I was fast enough to pass him back downwind to win the race. I was convinced that the set up and runners were perfect.

The third and final race, I started in the one block. The boat in the three block ran straight up wind across my bow. I thought I could get cute and just sail to leeward of him but as soon as I did that, he laid off right on top of me and jumped in the boat. I was in a horrible position at the start and there was no room for me to lay off more because all the other boats didn’t have any place to go. I thought that the best thing to do was to tack as soon as I could lay the leeward mark. I tacked over to starboard but I had forgotten about the darling mark so this meant I had to tack back again. With my slow start coupled with two tacks shortly after, things were looking pretty grim. I was way behind both sides of the race course but I stayed calm and just sailed the boat. I rounded the first weather mark in twenty something and rounded 12th at the first leeward mark. My speed was good enough that I easily sailed right through the fleet. I came back to a 4th by the finish with the leaders just in front of me. I believe that with one more lap, I could have won.

This was the last Gold fleet race of the day and the regatta. Tomas Zakrzewski became the new world champion. He is a great guy who has been working hard for many years.

Top 10 Gold fleet and
DN Jr World champion C-31
Karl-Hannes Tagu from Estonia.

We were supposed to have an awards ceremony in a castle in Orebro but a decision was made due to the light air forecast to move the fleet to a lake 100 km south which had black ice, no snow, and a better wind forecast. This is where they would try to get the European championships in on Friday and Saturday. When we got to the new site on Friday morning, we were greeted by 5” of blowing and drifting snow. It was amazing because 20 minutes on either side of this lake it was bright and sunny but a local phenomenon occurred which buried this lake with snow and ended our chances of holding the 2012 European championships. We had the awards for the world championships at a small truck stop diner where a standing room only crowd of 150 competitors applauded the new world champion, Tomas Zakrzewski. Then we got in the truck and drove back to Bad Zwischenahn.


Drying sails in Torston's shop.

We got up Saturday, unloaded the boats, dried everything, loosened the battens in the sails, checked and greased all of our runners, and stored everything properly until we return for the next regatta. Joerg invited Leon to go for a ride in his Rauschmeier airplane. From inside Torsten’s shop, we heard a plane fly over and realized it was them. As we came running out to see them, we wondered how Leon’s stomach was doing as Joerg dive bombed Torsten’s shop, went straight up in to the air until the plane stalled, and fell back towards the earth. I know if it were me in the plane, I would have been puking. Joerg pulled 2.5 Gs on their flight. Leon was wondering why Joerg asked him to spread his legs until Joerg barrel rolled the plane. Leon said it was the most fun he had on the whole trip. Leon’s wife, Maria, received a phone call from him after the flight and she said he was freakishly excited and very proud that he didn’t vomit or brown his European drawers. He is now convinced that his destiny is to be a pilot.

Saturday night we had another group party at Torsten’s house. Gareth Rowland came by and dropped off some fireworks which are always entertaining. I played soccer with Stefan Schweneker’s son, Ole, with a meatball until Leon yelled at me and told me he would kill me if I was doing that at his house. So then we decided to play with an orange until it broke and that was all of the soccer for the night. Ole is a soccer phenom who at age 11 is already being recruited and watched by the German national teams. He made me look bad even with a meatball. Sunday was the best day of the trip. We got up, had breakfast, and went down to the ice. While we were in Sweden, Lake Bad Zwischenahn had frozen over with 4” of black ice with 1” of light snow. In order to sail on Lake Bad Zwischenahn you need to have an ice boating license for the lake, insurance, and an invitation approved by the local authorities.

Day's end on Lake
Bad Zwischenahn.

The lake was filled with activity just the way I love to see it. There were three shoveled hockey rinks and little shoveled skating paths where people were skating. Others were walking their dogs on the ice. There were 15 DNs out on the race course. I walked out to the race course and sailed five different boats in five races. I took four firsts and a second. It was really rewarding to get to help these guys work on their boats. We made a lot of simple changes including tuning, mast and plank positions, shroud tension, pulley position and tightening up steering.

Greuncole and pinkle.

After that I walked back in and it was just a party on the lake by shore. It was wonderful. Leon was up in the bar with Eric Anderson, Eben Whitcomb, James “T” Thieler, and Kent. We all jumped in the Freightliner and drove back to Torsten’s shop. Torsten wanted to introduce us to a traditional German walk which involved walking from his shop back to the yacht club to eat Greuncole and pinkle.


Torsten and Eric Anderson.

Torsten has a small covered wagon which he provisioned with multiple types of beers and schnapps. As we did the five mile walk from his shop to the yacht club, every time we came to a corner, we would all drink a shot. He gave us all shot mugs with ribbons on them which hung around our necks. Leon and I thought there were a lot more corners than Torsten did and he had to explain to us the difference between corners and turns. When Leon and I argued with him, he reminded us that he was the boss. Somehow we made it to the yacht club and enjoyed a fantastic dinner with all of our friends at the same table.

Lake Bad Zwischenahn.

I remember walking out on the lake and looking up at the moon stars and thinking about my uncle Wendell. After that we loaded up in the car and drove back to Joerg’s house and I watched the Superbowl with German broadcasters while the rest of the guys around me sawed logs. The game came on at 12:30 PM so it was over at around 4 AM. Leon and Eric Anderson woke up for the last three minutes of the game. This was the best day of the trip.

Monday we went back to the lake and did a little bit more sailing but there weren’t as many people on the ice. Tuesday we went to the airport and flew home with the fifth place trophy.

Jan 31, 2012

Interview with Swedish television station.


Jan 29, 2012

Spent the last training day testing 3 sets of runners and 2 sails with Leon. However, it is predicted that the air will be different tomorrow, none to light. I'm feeling very prepared.


Jan 27, 2012

Since arriving in Germany, we've spent two and a half days checking the equipment and tuning the boats. I'm very happy to report that I feel as ready as I have ever been for the Worlds. We had a very relaxing ride to Orebro, Sweden from Germany with Torsten and are looking forward to sailing tomorrow. I'm so glad to have had eight days of practice in various conditions prior to this regatta.




World Championships Results

Provisional Series Standing - 10 races scored

Information is provisional and subject to modification
Regatta results saved: czwartek, 2 luty 2012 17:40:33 CET


(Entries=185) DN FLEET A | DN FLEET B | DN FLEET C | DN FLEET D

Division: DN FLEET A (50 boats) (top)

Pos Sail Skipper 1A 2A 3A Total
Points
Pos
1 P- 55 Zakrzewski, Tomasz 3 2 2 7,00 1
2 C- 31 Tagu, Karl-Hannes 2 3 5 10,00 2
3 D- 92 Ebler-Hansen, Hans 1 9 1 11,00 3
4 C- 6 Vooremaa, Vaiko 7 11 7 25,00 4
5 US- 44 Sherry, Ron 22 1 4 27,00 5
6 P- 65 Bernat, Marek 8 14 8 30,00 6
7 CZ- 99 Zobac, Jakub 4 6 21 31,00 7
8 G- 936 Kolb, Jost 10 13 10 33,00 8
9 O- 311 Alvikis, Matiss 20 4 11 35,00 9
10 P- 235 Baranowski, Adam 16 8 12 36,00 10
11 D- 112 Ebler, Thomas 13 10 13 36,00 11
12 M- 53 Hamrak, Peter 17 5 15 37,00 12
13 S- 81 Lindgren, Tomas 5 24 16 45,00 13
14 US- 5224 Thieler, James 11 12 24 47,00 14
15 S- 794 Wersäll, Oscar 6 7 36 49,00 15
16 P- 13 Kardas, Darek 9 21 27 57,00 16
17 US- 5193 Anderson, Eric 12 18 34 64,00 17
18 P- 114 Burczynski, Michal 32 15 20 67,00 18
19 C- 64 Akermann, Jaan 28 31 9 68,00 19
20 P- 110 Marcinczyk, Wieslaw 14 23 32 69,00 20
21 G- 624 Bock, Andreas 19 34 18 71,00 21
22 L- 66 Pettersson, John 21 29 23 73,00 22
23 O- 4 Elnionis, Raivo 51/DNF 17 6 74,00 23
24 S- 5 Luks, ?ke 24 25 28 77,00 24
25 P- 164 Burczynski, Pawel 15 20 44 79,00 25
26 C- 45 Kosk, Mihkel 25 51/DSQ 3 79,00 26
27 S- 639 Lindström, Dag 51/NoFin 16 19 86,00 27
28 C- 60 Randmaa, Rando 23 38 26 87,00 28
29 P- 155 Zakrzewski, Lukasz 30 22 35 87,00 29
30 L- 65 Pettersson, Mikael 31 39 17 87,00 30
31 R- 1 Vasilyev, Oleg 33 28 30 91,00 31
32 S- 8 Lönegren, Fredrik 26 32 33 91,00 32
33 P- 31 Graczyk, Robert 18 44 31 93,00 33
34 G- 737 Bohn, Joerg 41 41 14 96,00 34
35 L- 601 Winquist, John 51/DNF 26 22 99,00 35
36 G- 709 Voss, Karsten 36 35 29 100,00 36
37 P- 58 Henke, Jerzy 35 27 40 102,00 37
38 S- 143 Elfström, H?kan 37 30 37 104,00 38
39 O- 10 Graudums, Gatis 29 42 38 109,00 39
40 P- 134 Szumowski, Ryszard 51/DNF 19 39 109,00 40
41 US- 5219 Baker, Kent 38 33 41 112,00 41
42 P- 36 Jablonski, Karol 27 37 51/DNF 115,00 42
43 G- 551 Seegers, Christian 40 36 42 118,00 43
44 Z- 39 Vuithier, Jean-Claude 51/DNF 51/DNF 25 127,00 44
45 G- 99 C.Schreiber, Manfred 34 51/DSQ 43 128,00 45
46 G- 679 Schneider, Martin-Bjoern 39 40 51/DNF 130,00 46
47 C- 36 Vooremaa, Argo 51/DNF 43 51/DNF 145,00 47
48T G- 107 Zeiger, Bernd 51/DNF 51/DNF 51/DNF 153,00T 48T
48T G- 244 Forstmann, Dr.Axel 51/DNF 51/DNF 51/DNF 153,00T 48T
48T G- 666 Siems, Torsten 51/DNF 51/DNF 51/DNF 153,00T 48T

Notes

(1) Scoring System is Intnl DN Iceboat LowPoint
(2) Finishes in [brackets] denote throwouts

Division: DN FLEET B (48 boats) (top)

Pos Sail Skipper 1B 2B 3B Total
Points
Pos
1 D- 156 J?rgensen, Poul 4 2 3 9,00 1
2 S- 552 Lantz, Lars 5 3 9 17,00 2
3 C- 26 Pärtel, Valdo 20 6 4 30,00 3
4 S- 713 Gustring, Richard 17 4 10 31,00 4
5 G- 600 Dieckmann, Uwe 12 5 14 31,00 5
6 Z- 42 Fredy, Rudolf 3 14 19 36,00 6
7 O- 111 Omanbriedis, Ricards 7 18 13 38,00 7
8 M- 50 Denes-Marton, Hegyi 9 27 5 41,00 8
9 P- 24 Najdrowski, Jerzy 6 11 25 42,00 9
10 L- 37 Caravitis, Timoleon 16 20 7 43,00 10
11 P- 107 Stefaniuk, Marek-Artur 29 1 15 45,00 11
12 C- 47 Aljaste, Martin 1 30 17 48,00 12
13 G- 517 Obermaier, Sebastian 2 24 24 50,00 13
14 H- 580 Tolsma, Johan 14 25 12 51,00 14
15 G- 927 Heide, Hermann 23 7 22 52,00 15
16 Z- 78 Marti, Ueli 18 9 26 53,00 16
17 G- 8 Huber, Thomas 27 26 2 55,00 17
18 Z- 50 Durr, Philippe 13 38 11 62,00 18
19 C- 46 Hool, Mati 28 36 1 65,00 19
20 CZ- 92 Vacula, Martin 49/NoFin 13 6 68,00 20
21 Z- 57 Durr, Jerome 8 39 21 68,00 21
22 G- 677 Hotho, Matthias 35 16 18 69,00 22
23 G- 102 Hotho, Michael 19 23 27 69,00 23
24 Z- 25 Bachelin, Pierre 21 8 41 70,00 24
25 H- 720 vanRaay, Joost 26 10 35 71,00 25
26 L- 69 Löfberg, Mats 25 15 34 74,00 26
27 O- 6 Rozenbergs, Gunars 24 31 20 75,00 27
28 S- 107 Bokfors, Stefan 11 49/DNF 16 76,00 28
29 P- 208 Kisly, Miroslaw 22 17 38 77,00 29
30 T- 11 Sodeika, Sarunas 15 49/DNF 23 87,00 30
31 C- 5 Vare, Tonis 34 22 32 88,00 31
32 R- 5 Pulkov, Sergey 10 49/DSQ 30 89,00 32
33 H- 404 vanWettum, Martin 42 19 29 90,00 33
34 H- 467 vanRiemsdijk, Dideric 49/DNF 35 8 92,00 34
35 O- 1 Kruklis, Rudolfs 49/DNF 12 31 92,00 35
36 US- 1277 Bowman, Hal 37 21 37 95,00 36
37 P- 247 Brosz, Maciej 39 28 28 95,00 37
38 G- 986 Schlittenhard, Jens 30 33 39 102,00 38
39 L- 60 Winqvist, Jan 31 29 49/DNF 109,00 39
40 US- 4775 Whitcomb, Eben 41 34 36 111,00 40
41 S- 609 Sjöberg, Bengt 33 37 42 112,00 41
42 P- 104 Baranowski, Wojciech 32 40 43 115,00 42
43 G- 521 Mellenthin, Rainer 36 49/DSQ 33 118,00 43
44 P- 311 Worek, Wojciech 49/DNF 32 40 121,00 44
45 US- 3535 Kent, Jeffrey 38 49/DNF 49/DNF 136,00 45
46 OE- 221 Müller-Hartburg, Niklas 40 49/DNF 49/DNF 138,00 46
47T S- 42 Söderberg, H?kan 49/DNF 49/DSQ 49/DNF 147,00T 47T
47T US- 3433 Cummins, Robert 49/DNF 49/DNF 49/DNF 147,00T 47T

Notes

(1) Scoring System is Intnl DN Iceboat LowPoint
(2) Finishes in [brackets] denote throwouts

Division: DN FLEET C (43 boats) (top)

Pos Sail Skipper 1C 2C Total
Points
Pos
1 G- 597 Boettger, Wolfgang 2 1 3,00 1
2 CZ- 112 Ptasnik, Vladislav 7 5 12,00 2
3 CZ- 97 Vacula, Libor 4 9 13,00 3
4 S- 726 Stenberg, Patrik 10 4 14,00 4
5 S- 117 Oskarsson, Niklas 8 7 15,00 5
6 S- 515 Kvartsen, Tord 5 10 15,00 6
7 OE- 110 Romaner, Helmuth 6 14 20,00 7
8 G- 360 Schulz, Frank 12 12 24,00 8
9 US- 30 LeBeau, Leon 25 2 27,00 9
10 G- 4 Gottke, Dietmar 16 11 27,00 10
11 D- 126 M?ller, Lars 14 15 29,00 11
12 P- 44 Taber, Janusz-Marek 3 26 29,00 12
13 CZ- 100 Rocek, Roman 1 32 33,00 13
14 C- 89 Kukk, Jürgen 11 24 35,00 14
15 S- 812 Klemets, Eddie 21 16 37,00 15
16 H- 845 Greveling, Peter 18 19 37,00 16
17 G- 499 Schillert, Henning 17 20 37,00 17
18 S- 596 Stromberg, Gunnar 15 22 37,00 18
19 G- 544 Büchner, Thomas 13 25 38,00 19
20 H- 199 vanRooij, Peter 44/DNF 3 47,00 20
21 H- 472 Ploum, Piet 44/DNF 6 50,00 21
22 K- 11 Rowland, Gareth 22 28 50,00 22
23 G- 136 Meyer, Dirk 44/DNF 8 52,00 23
24 H- 460 Smit, Ruud 23 29 52,00 24
25 S- 810 Olsson, Nils-Olof 20 33 53,00 25
26 C- 4 Aardemaa, Toivo 9 44/DNF 53,00 26
27 G- 631 Schorling, Ernst-August 19 35 54,00 27
28 G- 896 Peters, Knut 44/DSQ 13 57,00 28
29 R- 38 Vostronosov, Victor 44/DNF 17 61,00 29
30 H- 635 Hartman, Leo 44/DNF 18 62,00 30
31 Z- 61 Marc-Martin, Philippe 24 38 62,00 31
32 L- 68 Pettersson, Dann 44/DNF 21 65,00 32
33 G- 527 Kring, Günter 44/DSQ 23 67,00 33
34 R- 172 Chusov, Alexey 44/DSQ 27 71,00 34
35 G- 749 Kroglowski, Wulf 44/DNF 30 74,00 35
36 C- 86 Skatskov, Gert 44/DSQ 31 75,00 36
37 N- 13 Schj?lberg-Henriksen, Per 44/DNF 34 78,00 37
38 R- 190 Laryushenkov, Anatoly 44/DNF 36 80,00 38
39 G- 44 Forstmann, Heiner 44/DSQ 37 81,00 39
40T R- 10 Galich, Alexander 44/DNF 44/DNF 88,00T 40T
40T R- 211 Kashirsky, Eugene 44/DNF 44/DSQ 88,00T 40T
40T H- 860 Bosker, Margreet 44/DNF 44/DNF 88,00T 40T
40T G- 905 Mauer, Dietmar 44/DNF 44/DNF 88,00T 40T

Notes

(1) Scoring System is Intnl DN Iceboat LowPoint
(2) Finishes in [brackets] denote throwouts

Division: DN FLEET D (44 boats) (top)

Pos Sail Skipper 1D 2D Total
Points
Pos
1 R- 98 Chernov, Evgeny 2 1 3,00 1
2 P- 243 Szczesny, Adam 4 2 6,00 2
3 H- 592 deSauvage-Nolting, Egbert 3 7 10,00 3
4 H- 534 Heida, Jan 12 3 15,00 4
5 CZ- 83 Harcuba, Petr 5 11 16,00 5
6 R- 79 Kozlova, Valentina 7 10 17,00 6
7 H- 962 Kloos, Ben 16 5 21,00 7
8 L- 53 Pennanen, Petri 6 16 22,00 8
9 G- 119 Keller, Jürgen 9 17 26,00 9
10 P- 338 Zarnowski, Maciej 19 8 27,00 10
11 G- 90 Stärzl, Alexander 15 13 28,00 11
12 P- 254 Sielicki, Rafal 10 18 28,00 12
13 G- 487 Schulz, Dieter 13 19 32,00 13
14 G- 654 Spitczok-von-Brisinski, Detlev 21 15 36,00 14
15 R- 105 Kopylov, Roman 18 20 38,00 15
16 H- 919 Spaas, Rolph 17 21 38,00 16
17 H- 877 vanHelden, Lex 22 24 46,00 17
18 Z- 87 Conus, Matthieu 1 45/DNF 46,00 18
19 H- 677 Mittelmeijer, Charles 45/DNF 4 49,00 19
20 S- 788 Svensson, Per Ove 45/DSQ 6 51,00 20
21 R- 169 Kudashev, Alexey 20 31 51,00 21
22 C- 96 Laurits, Hardi 8 45/DNF 53,00 22
23 G- 975 Huss, Detlef 45/DSQ 9 54,00 23
24 S- 807 Larsson, Richard 11 45/DNF 56,00 24
25 H- 667 Hopma-Zijlema, Piet 45/DNF 12 57,00 25
26 P- 148 Macugowski, Pawel 45/DNF 14 59,00 26
27 D- 173 Heilmann, Erik 14 45/DNF 59,00 27
28 G- 234 Greten, Ernst 45/DNF 22 67,00 28
29 S- 890 Bolsch, George 45/DNF 23 68,00 29
30 Z- 102 LHuillier, Arnaud 45/DNF 25 70,00 30
31 R- 185 Kumbrasev, Vechaslav 45/DNF 26 71,00 31
32 R- 713 Khodykin, Roman 45/DNF 27 72,00 32
33 CZ- 113 Komarek, Vojtech 45/DNF 28 73,00 33
34 P- 380 Kalinowski, Stefan 45/DNF 29 74,00 34
35 G- 54 Gottke, Jan 45/DNF 30 75,00 35
36T K- 1 Williams, Christopher 45/DNF 45/DNF 90,00T 36T
36T R- 37 Polenov, Viktor 45/DNF 45/DNF 90,00T 36T
36T OE- 39 Bauer, Rudi 45/DNF 45/DNF 90,00T 36T
36T OE- 41 Münnich, Peter 45/DNF 45/DNF 90,00T 36T
36T L- 121 Virta, Olli 45/DSQ 45/DNF 90,00T 36T
36T L- 731 Sivula, Timo 45/DNF 45/DNF 90,00T 36T
36T H- 785 vanVliet, Dennis 45/DNF 45/DNF 90,00T 36T
36T S- 789 Lingons, Lars-Olof 45/DNF 45/DNF 90,00T 36T
36T S- 814 Rehn, Gunnar 45/DSQ 45/DNF 90,00T 36T

Notes

(1) Scoring System is Intnl DN Iceboat LowPoint
(2) Finishes in [brackets] denote throwouts

Information is provisional and subject to modification

Jury Chair: Dorota Michalczyk